Parents' Transition Insights

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Phase 2: S1 - Now we are here

 

Issue 2.2: Teachers' awareness of the child's difficulties

In order that children's needs are met in the classroom, subject teachers should know which children are dyslexic. They should have an understanding of dyslexia and its implications for learning. Primary schools do pass on information to support secondary teachers to meet all pupils' needs.

Often subject teachers are aware that a pupil is dyslexic but do not acknowledge this to the pupil. Reasons for this may be a lack of opportunity to discuss this in a one to one situation without the peer group listening in or a feeling that the pupils may not want to discuss dyslexia. Pupils interviewed thought it would be helpful if teachers could find a way of acknowledging that they were aware of a pupil's dyslexia. Parents also thought it would be helpful if teachers could acknowledge during parents' evenings that they were aware of their children's dyslexia.

The video clips below reflect parents' thinking about whether teachers of their child know about the child's difficulties.

Advice

If you think that subject teachers are unaware that your child is dyslexic it would be worthwhile contacting the school to find out if the essential information has been passed to and accessed by teachers.


 
Annette, Amelia's mum
 

• Not sure if teachers are aware of Amelia's dyslexia



 
Pam, Connor's mum
 

• Not sure if teachers are aware Connor is dyslexic



 
Tanya, Callum's mum
 

• Teachers all know about Callum's dyslexia



 
Alison, David's mum
 

• Teachers may know David is dyslexic


Teachers need to be aware that a pupil is dyslexic but parents and pupils also said that it would be helpful if teachers acknowledged the fact that they were aware.


 
Norah, Jamie's mum
 

• Support for Learning department have been excellent



 
Annette, Amelia's mum
 

• Feel the need to prove Amelia's dyslexia